The human body is almost perfect, it is a miracle of engineering, physics, chemistry, mechanics and who knows what else, yoga enhances its qualities and amplifies its energy.

The ankle is a movable joint of angular hinge joint type (trochlea) that is situated between the proximal end of the talus and the malleolar forceps (formed by the distal ends of tibia and fibula).
A very important role in the tightness of this joint is played by the ligaments, which create a sort of band, a sort of ankle brace that holds the malleolar forceps.
This joint allows the flexion-extension of the foot and, together with the other tarsus joints, it contributes to the pron-supination.

Ankle’s mobility is very important because it allows the foot to adapt to the roughness of the ground when walking, by distributing better the forces that go up to the other joints (including the spine).

Asanas keep this articulation flexible and elastic; hence aging and decreased mobility are much slower, and the joint stays healthy for longer.
During practice, we use all movements that the ankle and the foot can perform in their normal range of motion.

Foot dorsiflexion, such as it is in paschimottanasana or in virabhadrasana III. Plantar flexion (the instep of the foot), such as in urdhva prasarita eka padasana, or virasana. Supination, when the plant of the back foot rests on the ground in virabhadrasana II for example. The pronation of both feet, in Malasana. The human body is almost perfect, it is a miracle of engineering, physics, chemistry, mechanics and who knows what else, yoga enhances its qualities and amplifies its energy.




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